TV and Radio Guide w/c 27 May 2013

The science of Music

Sorry for the late posting of next week’s guide. The weather has been too nice and I’ve been outside all day. @MrsDrSarah has collated the guide again this week and her pick of the week is The Science of Music, presented by Robert Winston. I have to say that this is my pick for the week as well, but I’ll bring to your attention a radio programme that we missed last week (despite the constant trails on Radio 4) about the resistance to antibiotics and what it may mean in the near future for surgical operations (it’s not good news), that’s File on 4: Superbugs.

My video for the week is a reminder that the ISS will soon be visible in the UK skies again: Sci Guide from the Headsqueeze Youtube channel has a quick guide on the ISS and how astronauts get there. I’ll also show you this trailer for a film that I’m looking forward to seeing in October. If you’ve ever wanted to become an astronaut, this may put you off: Gravity

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TV and Radio Guide w/c 20 May 2013

Genetically modified Pig 26 (Source: The Independent)

Another quiet week for Science TV and Radio, collated by @MrsDrSarah.

Sarah’s picks for this week are  Costing the Earth (on Tues and Wed) about GM technology which may be helpful for A level Biologists, and Map Man (on Sat) which tells the story of the first London A-Z. My picks are The Why Factor on Monday about why children lie as part of their development, and All in the Mind from last week which includes a piece on research into effective revision techniques.

This week’s video is via @Alby. Science@NASA produce many videos about the work NASA does; although recently funding decisions have required them to cut back on their educational output, hopefully this will be temporary. This video (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html?collection_id=14483&media_id=163147311) describes the monitoring of meteor strikes on the moon, and an event in March this year that was as bright as a 4th magnitude star, easily seen without a telescope.

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